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Sidney Powell’s Net Worth, Upcoming books, Husband, Family and more

American attorney and former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell usually makes headlines for promoting conspiracy theories. Powell has been one of the most passionate voices against Joe Biden’s presidential victory in 2020. 

Early life 

Powell was born in Durham, North Carolina, and grew up in Raleigh. She aspired to become a lawyer from a very early age. 

Education 

Powell obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of North Carolina. 

Career

Powell began her career as one of the youngest federal prosecutors in the U.S. 

Sidney was an assistant United States attorney for Texas’s Western and Northern Districts and the Eastern District of Virginia from 1978-88.  Powell later established her law firm in Texas in 1993. 

Sources of income and net worth

Most of Powell’s income comes from her high-profile cases, and the royalty from her published work. Although an approximation suggests it is between $1-5 million, Powell’s current net worth is uncertain. 

Family 

Powell has a son from a marriage that ended “years ago.” Not much is known about her personal life as Powell is highly private. 

Published work

Powell has written opinion pieces for The New York Observer, The Daily Caller, The Hill, National Review, Fox News, media organizations, and conservative content producers. She has published two books:

  • (May 1, 2014). Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice. Brown Books. 
  • (February 18, 2020) Conviction Machine: Standing Up to Federal Prosecutorial Abuse. Encounter Books. 

In addition, she has published several journal articles on law practice. Examples include:

  • Powell, Sidney (1988). “Federal Jurisdiction in Criminal Appeals—Appealable Orders in the Fifth Circuit.” Texas Tech Law Review. 
  • Powell, Sidney (1990). “Federal Appeals in the Fifth Circuit: Tips for the Texas Practitioner.” Baylor Law Review. 
  • Gabriel, Henry D; Powell, Sidney (1994). Federal Appellate Practice Guide: Fifth Circuit. Rochester, New York: Lawyers Cooperative Publishing. 

The vote transfer via supercomputer hoax

Dennis Montgomery, a software designer, and alleged conspiracy theorist claimed that a government supercomputer would transfer votes from Trump to Biden mere days before the 2020 presidential election. Powell went on record on the Lou Dobbs Tonight tv show on November 6Nand again two days later on Maria Bartiromo’s Fox Business program to support the ludicrous claims. 

CISA director Christopher Krebs described the supercomputer theory as “nonsense” and “a hoax’. CISA described the 2020 election as “the most secure in American history,” with “no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes or was in any way compromised.”

Trump’s legal team

After the election, Trump established a legal team to upturn Biden’s victory. The panel consisted of Rudy Giuliani and Joseph DiGenova, Victoria Toensing, Jenna Ellis, and Powell. The team then filed several lawsuits in many states regarding allegations of vote harvesting, illegal votes, machine errors, vote dumps, and late-counted votes. 

International Communist plot hoax

Without any concrete evidence, Powell alleged that Cuba, China, Venezuela, Hugo Chávez (who died in 2013), George Soros, the Clinton Foundation, and Antifa had joined hands to engineer an international Communist ploy to rig the 2020 U.S. presidential election. She also alleged that Dominion Voting Systems “can set and run an algorithm that probably ran all over the country to take a certain percentage of votes from President Trump and flip them to President Biden.”

The U.S. Army and Scytl controversy

Powell came out in support of a conspiracy theory spread by Congressman Louie Gohmert, OANN, and others which stated election results showing a landslide victory for Trump had been transmitted to the German office of the Spanish electronic voting firm Scytl, after which a company server was supposedly seized in a raid by the United States Army. The U.S. Army and Scytl refuted these claims. 

Dominion scam

In an interview with Newsmax on November 21N, Powell accused Georgia’s Republican governor, Brian Kemp, of being “in on the Dominion scam” and suggested financial impropriety. Powell additionally alleged that fraud had cost Doug Collins the nonpartisan blanket primary against incumbent Kelly Loeffler in the Senate race in Georgia. She also claimed the Democratic Party had used rigged Dominion machines to defeat Bernie Sanders in 2016 primary and that Sanders learned of this but “sold out.” She said she would “blow up” Georgia with a “biblical” court filing.

Off the Trump bandwagon

The Washington Post reported that Trump later cut ties with Powell because she harmed his more excellent legal vision as she was “practicing law on her own.” Trump was also disdainful of the coverage Powell received from Tucker Carlson Tonight. 

Speech at QAnon conference 

Powell spoke at a QAnon conference in Dallas over Memorial Day weekend. She falsely asserted Trump “can simply be reinstated, that a new Inauguration Day is set,” eliciting cheers from the crowd. This was supposedly August 13A.

 

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About the author
Tanvi S

Editor-in-Chief at World Wire.
I'm very passionate about literature and cannot do without my daily dose of well-written literature to read. I mostly write opinion based articles.

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