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StateWise 2020 Election Fraud Report by Seth Keshel

StateWise 2020 Election Fraud Report by Seth Keshel

Identified on LinkedIn as an executive and former baseball analyst, Seth Keshel does not specify any electoral experience. As noted in his report, the state-by-state tally of Biden’s “excess votes” are “lenient” estimates that require further research, although he frequently repeats the false claim that the numbers suggest fraud.

Seth Keshel analyzed the election results following the November 2020 presidential election based on voter registration levels and actual votes. In several counties, he found alarming irregularities that differed from trend lines that (in many cases) had been reliable for over 100 years. Accordingly, he has published reports for both counties and states that indicate which counties’ votes correspond with voter registration trends and which have small or large deviations from these trends.

Seth Keshel Election Report 2020

Trump votes Biden votes Potential fraud estimate
Alabama 1,441,170 (62.0%) 849,624 (36.6%) 32,000 (3.8%)
Alaska 189,951 (52.8%) 153,778 (42.8%) 19,000 (12.4%)
Arizona 1,661,686 (49.1%) 1,672,143 (49.4%) 210,000 (12.6%)
Arkansas 760,647 (62.4%) 423,932 (34.8%) 8,000 (1.9%)
California 6,006,429 (34.3%) 11,110,250 (63.5%) 1,346,000 (12.1%)
Colorado 1,364,607 (41.90%) 1,804,352 (55.40%) 183,000 (10.1%)
Connecticut 715,291 (39.2%) 1,080,680 (59.2%) 117,000 (10.8%)
Delaware 200,603 (39.8%) 296,268 (58.7%) 27,000 (9.1%)
Florida 5,668,731 (51.22%) 5,297,045 (47.86%) 296,000 (5.6%)
Georgia 2,461,854 (49.2%) 2,473,633 (49.5%) 299,000 (12.1%)
Hawaii 196,864 (34.3%) 366,130 (63.7%) 55,000 (15.0%)
Idaho 554,119 (63.9%) 287,021 (33.1%) 15,000 (5.2%)
Illinois 2,446,891 (41.3%) 3,471,915 (57.5%) 295,000 (8.5%)
Indiana 1,729,519 (57.0%) 1,242,416 (41.0%) 74,000 (6.0%)
Iowa 897,672 (53.1%) 759,061 (44.9%) 0 (0.0%)
Kansas 771,406 (56.2%) 570,323 (41.5%) 48,000 (8.4%)
Kentucky 1,326,646 (62.1%) 772,474 (36.2%) 62,000 (8.0%)
Louisiana 1,255,776 (58.5%) 856,034 (39.9%) 36,000 (4.2%)
Maine 360,737 (44.0%) 435,072 (53.1%) 31,000 (7.1%)
Maryland 976,414 (32.15%) 1,985,023 (65.36%) 128,000 (6.4%)
Massachusetts 1,167,202 (32.1%) 2,382,202 (65.6%) 235,000 (9.9%)
Michigan 2,649,852 (47.8%) 2,804,040 (50.6%) 527,000 (18.8%)
Minnesota 1,484,065 (45.28%) 1,717,077 (52.40%) 228,000 (13.3%)
Mississippi 756,764 (57.6%) 539,398 (41.1%) 15,000 (2.8%)
Missouri 1,718,736 (56.8%) 1,253,014 (41.4%) 49,000 (3.9%)
Montana 343,602 (56.92%) 244,786 (40.55%) 46,000 (18.8%)
Nebraska 556,846 (58.51%) 374,583 (39.36%) 33,000 (8.8%)
Nevada 669,890 (47.67%) 703,486 (50.06%) 100,000 (14.2%)
New Hampshire 365,654 (45.36%) 424,921 (52.71%) 40,000 (9.4%)
New Jersey 1,883,274 (41.4%) 2,608,335 (57.3%) 327,000 (12.5%)
New Mexico 401,894 (43.5%) 501,614 (54.3%) 84,000 (16.7%)
New York 3,251,997 (37.7%) 5,244,886 (60.9%) 292,000 (5.6%)
North Carolina 2,758,775 (49.93%) 2,684,292 (48.59%) 257,000 (9.6%)
North Dakota 235,595 (65.1%) 114,902 (31.8%) 8,000 (7.0%)
Ohio 3,154,834 (53.27%) 2,679,165 (45.24%) 88,000 (3.3%)
Oklahoma 1,020,280 (65.4%) 503,890 (32.3%) 39,000 (7.7%)
Oregon 958,448 (40.37%) 1,340,383 (56.45%) 162,000 (12.1%)
Pennsylvania 3,378,263 (48.8%) 3,459,923 (50.0%) 504,000 (14.6%)
Rhode Island 199,922 (38.6%) 307,486 (59.4%) 45,000 (14.6%)
South Carolina 1,385,103 (55.1%) 1,091,541 (43.4%) 119,000 (10.9%)
South Dakota 261,043 (61.8%) 150,471 (35.6%) 11,000 (7.3%)
Tennessee 1,852,475 (60.7%) 1,143,711 (37.5%) 101,000 (8.8%)
Texas 5,890,347 (52.1%) 5,259,126 (46.5%) 675,000 (12.8%)
Utah 865,140 (58.13%) 560,282 (37.65%) 131,000 (23.4%)
Vermont 112,704 (30.7%) 242,820 (66.1%) 34,000 (14.0%)
Virginia 1,962,430 (44.0%) 2,413,568 (54.1%) 217,000 (9.0%)
Washington 1,584,651 (38.77%) 2,369,612 (57.97%) 333,000 (14.1%)
West Virginia 545,382 (68.6%) 235,984 (29.7%) 23,000 (9.7%)
Wisconsin 1,610,184 (48.82%) 1,630,866 (49.45%) 139,000 (8.5%)
Wyoming 193,559 (69.9%) 73,491 (26.6%) 1,000 (1.4%)

In the table above are the official vote counts, plus the estimated number of excess Biden votes that could have been cast. This is the number of votes that seem oddly higher than what might have been expected from the trends. Based on population growth and decline, recent historical data on voting and registration, and party registration information, these figures are based on trend analysis in the modern political era.

In an interview with The Hill, Seth explains that he always takes a lenient view of his estimates, and does not consider cyber-attacks that change votes subtly in ways that can go undetected by statistical techniques.

Donald Trump On Seth Keshel’s Investigation and Report

President Donald Trump released a statement thanking Seth Keshel for his work, you can read the statement published in Seth Keshel’s official telegram channel below ( the statement was shared in the telegram channel of Seth Keshel ).

donald trump on seth keshel
Credits – Seth Keshel

Suggested Article – Electoral fraud expert Seth Keshel releases national fraud figures

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  • Thank you for sharing this information and the findings of his report. Don’t care for the obviously biased opinion and claim that the information is false. You’re not an expert in this arena and you should let the data speak for itself. If all this comes out to be true, which I believe it is, and you don’t retract your opinion, you’ll be discredited and lose followers. Always better to run with the truth than go with the flow. The path of least resistance makes crooked rivers and crooked men.